Author: Donna R Causey

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Farming in Clark County, Kentucky in 1916 required the help of the whole family as can be seen in these remarkable photographs below – many have names of the families

Lewis Wickes Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940) was an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States. He visited Kentucky in 1916 and took many photographs of early schools and children working […]

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This 1910 census advance report reveals humor of the time

This humorous tongue-in-cheek report about the up-coming census report that year was printed in The New York Press in 1910. ADVANCE CENSUS REPORTS Number of families owning phonographs 2,264,721 Number of men holding worthless checks and invalid promissory notes. 72,986,279 Number of cities where taxes are reasonable 6 Number of ministers – 232,689 Number of […]

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Hampton Place -[old photographs] where General Winfield Scott retired when there were no more worlds to conquer

*Note: The language below may be a little antiquated because they are excerpts and exact transcriptions from the book  –Transcription from Historic Houses of New Jersey By Weymer Jay Mills .J. B. Lippincott Company – written in  1902 Best loved house The house best loved by the old residents of Elizabethtown, New Jersey is the Scott House, […]

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Extraordinary 1885 [portraits] of Native Americans includes Sitting Bull with Buffalo Bill

Portraits of Native Americans This photograph is of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill, 1885 taken by David Francis Barry photographer (1854-1934) Photograph originally taken by William Notman studios, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, during Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, August 1885. Later copyrighted by D.F. Barry in June 1897 Two photos (front and side) of Amos Little, […]

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These people found a unique way to advertise

Some people believed in engraving their trades on their tombstones.   Epitaph to blind woodsawyer in Georgia: “While none ever saw him see thousands have seen him saw.”   Elkhart, Indiana, epitaph on tombstone of teacher: “School is out Teacher has gone home.”   Epitaph to fireman in Wilmington, North Carolina “William P. Monroe Died […]