Life in the Fifties in North Dakota was not all as happy as I thought

Life in the Fifties on the North Dakota Prairie

by

Carolyn Rebholz

Growing up in N.D. in the fifties provided memories of 3-day snowstorms creating tunnels of only a one-way passage; getting horses hitched to a stone boat to pull us to school; raising ducklings to learn the process of life; and winning snowball fights with the boys.Snow tunnel

School meant competition

Although we lived in a rural area with homes two-three miles apart, we all seemed to be friends in and out of school. But school meant competition.  The school was a grade 1-12 with a high of 80 students and a low of 45 students.

Learning and competition were true satisfactions.  The school climate helped us stretch beyond the daily lessons.  We were curious kids.  Friends and family were the focus in the reading scenarios with Dick and Jane Series, Spot, the spaniel, and Puff, the calico cat.North Dakota -carolyn

 Our lives and loves were simple

Kids frolicking with their friends and beloved pets happened in our vivid imaginations as the story moved ahead, after school on the playground and at home.  Our lives and loves were simple.   Some of the reading was expanded with “Friends and Neighbors” and “More Friends and Neighbors” as we matured into the middle grades.  The same themes spiraled throughout each volume. The important aspect was the concepts of friends, neighbors, and family were presented positively, so we learned what happy could be.

As we advanced, the joys and thrills turned into the reality that life also had its strife and disappointments in its pathway.  We realized that growing up would have its joys and challenges as well. Knowledge of family issues was in existence, but not exposed usually.  In fact it was covered up.

About the age of twelve I realized my happy childhood was not the experience of my father discovered quite stealthily over time.

 

Fractured Memories: A story of tolerance, integrity, and talents – by Carolyn Rebholz

 

About Carolyn Rebholz

About the age of twelve I realized my happy childhood was not the experience of my father discovered quite stealthily over time.

The findings spawned my first book, Fractured Memories: A story of tolerance, integrity, and talents
published December 2014.  It is available on Amazon.com in paperback and kindle e-book.

Carolyn Rebholz holds a BS in secondary teacher education from Valley City State University in North Dakota and a master’s in guidance and counseling from the University of Wisconsin, with postgraduate work in psychology at Indiana University and the University of Minnesota. She went on to become an educator and academic counselor in Edina, Minnesota.

This background gave her thirty years of experience in understanding the emotional levels of adolescents and young adults. Academic counseling in the US Federal Witness Protection Program has further enhanced her interaction and observation skills in working with students who are emotionally and physically separated from their families and friends as they attempt to build new lives. These insights permeate Fractured Memories.

Rebholz wrote the introduction to the book Eating Life Cereal with a Bigger Spoon Than Most, By Spenser J. Somers.

She currently lives in The Villages, Florida.

About Carolyn Rebholz

About the age of twelve I realized my happy childhood was not the experience of my father discovered quite stealthily over time.

The findings spawned my first book, Fractured Memories: A story of tolerance, integrity, and talents
published December 2014.  It is available on Amazon.com in paperback and kindle e-book.

Carolyn Rebholz holds a BS in secondary teacher education from Valley City State University in North Dakota and a master’s in guidance and counseling from the University of Wisconsin, with postgraduate work in psychology at Indiana University and the University of Minnesota. She went on to become an educator and academic counselor in Edina, Minnesota.

This background gave her thirty years of experience in understanding the emotional levels of adolescents and young adults. Academic counseling in the US Federal Witness Protection Program has further enhanced her interaction and observation skills in working with students who are emotionally and physically separated from their families and friends as they attempt to build new lives. These insights permeate Fractured Memories.

Rebholz wrote the introduction to the book Eating Life Cereal with a Bigger Spoon Than Most, By Spenser J. Somers.

She currently lives in The Villages, Florida.

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