The Japanese Internment of WWII – Their story in pictures – Part II – Planning the Relocation

The attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 made military and political leaders suspect that Imperial Japan was preparing a full-scale attack on the West Coast of the United States. There were many Japanese-American living in the area and the U. S. Government became increasingly concerned about where the loyalties lie.

After much debate, the Government finally decided to treat all Japanese-Americans as enemy aliens and they were ordered to relocate to internment camps for the duration of the world.

Internment camps were set up to house the Japanese-Americans.  In the pictures below, photographer Russell Lee documented their removal in April and May of 1942.

Uncertain of their future, these Japanese-Americans of San Benito County, California held a picnie to discuss the situation while they waited for final evacuation orderspicnic10

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Meanwhile construction was started on where to house the Japanese-Americans – Below are photographs of construction of the San Benito County reception center at Salinas, California

Construction work at Santa Anita reception center

 

Construction work at Santa Anita reception center2

 

Construction work on accommodations at Santa Anita reception center

Race tracks, fairgrounds and rodeo grounds were utilized throughout the state of California for reception centers for the Japanese. The Santa Anita racetrack in California was converted into a reception centerSanta Anita Racetrack

Construction work on accommodations for Japanese

Construction work on accommodations for the evacuees at the Santa Anita reception center3

 

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Finally, the day came when they had to pack up and move

Japanese farmer packing up his tools before he is evacuated from West coast areas under United States Army war emergency order - used

 

Japanese pack their belongings as they close their stores in Little Tokyo2

 

Japanese pack up their belongings as they close their stores in Little Tokyo

 

Japanese-Americans leaving for reception center

 

Faith and Courage: 2nd edition -A Novel of Colonial America Inspired by real people and actual events, the family saga of colonial America continues with Ambrose Dixon’s family. Faith and Courage presents the religious persecution of Quakers in Pre-Revolutionary War days of America intertwined with a love story.

 

Faith and Courage: 2nd edition -A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love Book 2): Book 2 in Tapestry of Love Series


By (author): Donna R Causey

List Price: Price Not Listed
Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me

All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .

For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

One Response to The Japanese Internment of WWII – Their story in pictures – Part II – Planning the Relocation

  1. Pingback: The Japanese Internment of WWII – The Evacuation – Their story in pictures – Part I | Days Gone By

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