Proud migrant workers in these pics once owned farms

The Great Depression and Dust Bowl were difficult years in United States History.  Many people left their farms and became migrant workers due to the Dust Bowl and traveled to California to pick vegetables and fruit.

This song Why don’t you write a letter home? was performed by Sam Bell in Tuolumne County, California on August 2, 1939. Sidney Robertson Cowell was the collector for the Archive of Folk Culture for the Library of Congress.

Photojournalist Dorothea Lange documented the struggles they had in these amazing photographs. The notes with each of the photographs are from Dorothea Lange.

Below: This boy, fourteen, is in the eighth grade but was unable to continue school because of insufficient food and clothing. He subsisted two days on frozen tomatoes from field nearby. His father said “They call me a road hog and a bum; but if I am, how did that boy get into the eighth grade?”  Taken at American River camp, near Sacramento, California by photographer, Dorothea Lange.

Boy, fourteen, in eighth grade. Now unable to attend because

 

 Food Supply was lean at the Camp

Here is an example of a food supply for a family at the American River Camp in 1936.

Food supply of migrant family. American River camp near Sacramento, California

Tent interior in a pea pickers' camp. Food supply and household equipment. Santa Clara County, California 1939 Dorothea Lange

Living Conditions in California were poor

The photograph below is of a destitute family at the American River camp, Sacramento, California. It looks like they are trying to collect wood to build some type of housing.

Destitute family. American River camp, Sacramento, California

 Finding enough water was a problem

Picture below was taken at the American River camp, California in 1936. Notice the dirty clothes and flies.  Acquiring a good supply of water was a problem during the drought.  These scenes inspired John Steinbeck to write the Grapes of WrathDirty clothes and flies. American River camp, near Sacramento, California

 Destitute family

The destitute family below has five children, ages two to seventeen years.

Destitute family. American River camp. Five children aged two to seventeen. Near Sacramento California

 

Thirty Families lived here

Below is a migrant camp on the outskirts of Sacramento, California on the American River. About thirty families lived on this flat.

Migrant camp on the outskirts of Sacramento, California on the American River. About thirty families lived on this flat

 

It was hard to find enough water for the camp so clothes were often dirty

This is a photograph of the water supply source for cotton migrant workers at the American River Camp in San Joaquin Valley, California.

Water supply. Migratory camp for cotton pickers. San Joaquin Valley, California. American River camp

 

They rented ground space to camp

This migrant winter camp was on the outskirts of Sacramento, California. Eighty families, built their own shacks, and paid one dollar and twenty-five cents a month for ground rent which included water. It was one half-mile from American River camp.

Migrant winter camp on outskirts of Sacramento, Californi.

Only Toilet Facilities for Ten cabins at a camp

Ten families stayed at this auto camp, men, women and children. They paid $10 per mouth for a cabin near Salinas, California.

Toilet for ten cabins, men, women and children in auto camp for Arkansawyers, recent migrants to California. Rent for cabins ten dollars a month. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Living conditions for migratory children

This was in a private auto camp during pea harvest. Tent space fifty cents a week. Outskirts of Calipatria, California

Living conditions for migratory children in private auto camp during pea harvest. Tent space fifty cents a week. Outskirts of Calipatria, California

Resident Nurse visit

Farmersville, California – a resident nurse interviews mother and examines sick baby 1939 in a camp.

Farm Security Administration (FSA) camp. Farmersville, California. Resident nurse interviews mother and examines sick baby 1939

Pea pickers waiting at Farm Security Administration

Pea pickers are waiting at the FSA office for issue of surplus commodities. Calipatria, California 1939 Pea pickers waiting at Farm Security Administration (FSA) office for issue of surplus commodities. Calipatria, California 1939 Dorothea Lange

Sometimes there was no work available

Inside a pea picker’s tent in the middle of the morning. No work. Santa Clara County, California.

Inside a pea picker's tent in the middle of the morning. No work. Santa Clara County, California

Books by Donna R. Causey

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) – Inspired by true events – colonial America comes alive with pirate attacks, religious discord, and governmental disagreements in the pre-Revolutionary War days of America.

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)


By (author): Donna R Causey

List Price: $9.77 USD
New From: $9.48 USD In Stock

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me

All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .

For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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