Vivid photographs reveal Sharecroppers lives in Georgia

Sharecropping is a system of agriculture in which a landowner allows a tenant to use the land in return for a share of the crops produced on the land. Sharecropping occurred extensively in the Southern United States during the Reconstruction era (1865–1877). 

The South had been devastated by war; planters had ample land but little money for wages or taxes. At the same time, most of the former slaves had labor but no money and no land; they rejected the kind of gang labor that typified slavery.

The solution was the sharecropping system focused on cotton, which was the only crop that could generate cash for the croppers, landowners, merchants and the tax collector. Poor white farmers, who previously had done little cotton farming, needed cash as well and became sharecroppers.

The photographs below by photojournalist, Dorothea Lange, reveal the hard life of families who were sharecroppers in rural Georgia in 1937. She included the comments with the photographs.

Landless family of cotton sharecroppers, Macon County, Georgia. For their labor they receive half the crop they produce, and the equivalent of ten dollars a month “furnish” (credit) from the landlord. Their vegetable garden failed this year for lack of rain.

landless family near Macon2 1937 Lange

landless family near Macon 1937 Lange

 

Cotton sharecropper family. Macon County, Georgia2 1937 lange

 

Cotton sharecropper family. Macon County, Georgia 1937 lange

House occupied by sharecropper family for seven years. Near Hartwell, GeorgiaHouse occupied by sharecropper family for seven years. Near Hartwell, Georgia 1937 lange

Sharecropper’s child whose father below receives five dollars a month furnish from the landowners. Macon County, GeorgiaSharecropper's child whose father receives five dollars a month furnish from the landowners. Macon County, Georgia 1937 lange

Sharecropper's child whose father receives five dollars a month furnish from the landowners. Macon County, Georgia

Father of landless family of cotton sharecroppers, Macon County, Georgia. For their labor they receive half the crop they produce, and the equivalent of ten dollars a month “furnish” (credit) from the landlord. Their vegetable garden failed this year for lack of rain.

Father of landless sharecropper family. Macon County, Georgia 1937 lange

 

Cotton field and plantation house. Macon County, Georgia 1937 lange

Farm boy with sack full of boll weevils which he has picked off of cotton plants. Macon County, Georgia

Farm boy with sack full of boll weevils which he has picked off of cotton plants. Macon County, Georgia 1937 lange

Farm boy with sack full of boll weevils which he has picked off of cotton plants. Macon County, Georgia2 1937 lange

Sharecropper family near Hazlehurst, Georgia, 1937Sharecropper family near Hazlehurst, Georgia 1937 Lange

Sharecropper family near Hazlehurst, Georgia2 1937 lange

 

Sharecropper family near Hazlehurst, Georgia3 1937 lange

The cotton sharecropper’s unit is one mule and the land he can cultivate with a one-horse plow. Greene County, Georgia 1937

The cotton sharecropper's unit is one mule and the land he can cultivate with a one-horse plow. Greene County, Georgia2 1937 dorothea lange

 

The cotton sharecropper's unit is one mule and the land he can cultivate with a one-horse plow. Greene County, Georgia 1937 dorothea lange

Thirteen-year old sharecropper boy near Americus, Georgia 1937Thirteen-year old sharecropper boy near Americus, Georgia 1937 Lange

 

Do you have friends and family ask you how to get started in family research? This is a hard question to answer in a few minutes. Refer them to the book below instead to help them get started in this fun hobby. Purchase several – Books make great gifts!

WHERE DO I START? Hints and Tips for Beginning Genealogists with On-line resources

Click here for all historic books by Donna R. Causey

 

WHERE DO I START? Hints and Tips for Beginning Genealogists with On-line resources


By (author): Donna R Causey

List Price: Price Not Listed
Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me

All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .

For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

Leave a Reply

Please use your real name instead of you company name or keyword spam.