Do you know which town in America made children their highest priority? [See pics]

Improving the lives of children – a priority

The most important aspect in this town was to provide low income families with affordable housing to raise their children in and a safe environment with access to large open “green” spaces.

Pathways created between homes

Pathways were created in each section of homes to connect the sections to each other, as well as provide a pathway to the Village center.

Streets were designed with children’s safety as a priority

The streets were designed with children and safety as a priority. There are three types of streets: residential, feeder, and main street. Residential streets are fairly short and are usually courts or dead ends, which significantly limits through traffic. Each residential street empties into a slightly larger street known as a feeder street to help guide cars into the last type of larger street, known a main street.

Many residents of Greenhills, Ohio, a Resettlement Community of President Roosevelt’s New Deal projects,  in 1938 often found employment in the village working in the community and for the school.

Child in swing at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonChild in backayard at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

School Greenhills, Ohio Jan 1938 by John Vachon

 

Greenhills school, Jan 1938 by John

 

Schoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Schoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Named alphabetically

Another unique feature of Greenhills, Ohio and Greendale is how the streets in each section were named alphabetically. All the streets in a given area start with the same letter.

Schoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon2

Schoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon2

Schoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolroom at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon3

Schoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon3

Schoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonSchoolchildren at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon4

Kindergarten at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonKindergarten at Greenhills, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

First Grade class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonFirst Grade class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Library at Green Hills School Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonLibrary at Green Hills School Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Children with atheletic instructor Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonChildren with atheletic instructor Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Children going in after recess, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonChildren going in after recess, Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Manuel training class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonManuel training class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Girl sewing in Home economics class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonGirl sewing in Home economics class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

Home economics class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John VachonHome economics class Ohio October 1938, by photographer John Vachon

More photographs of this unique and historic housing project of 1935

“Tapestry of Love is a Historical fiction series about the ancestors of a family who originally settled on the Eastern Shore of Virginia in 1638 and migrated to Alabama in the early 1800’s

Best-selling RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel Of Colonial America: Book one in the Tapestry of Love Series 

 

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