[vintage pictures] Some towns in the United States were declared unconstitutional in the late 1940s &50s

Towns were declared unconstitutional

Some towns that had their start during the Depression Era were declared socialistic and unconstitutional in the 1940s and 1950s era when the anti-socialists were influencing American politics.  President Franklin Delano Roosevelt created a program to build new suburban communities as part of his New Deal plans for the country. The overseeing department was the Resettlement Administration which later became a part of the Farms Security Administration.

Greenhills, Ohio

Greenhills, Ohio is now one of only three “Greenbelt Towns” left built in the United States. The other two were Greenbelt, Maryland and Greendale, Wisconsin.

Rexford Guy Tugwell (“Rex the Red” in conservative circles) was a Princeton agricultural economist who was part of Roosevelt’s brain trust.

Photojournalist, John Vachon, took the following photographs of Greenhills in October 1939.

Oldest shopping strip mall in Ohio at Greenshills when it was new, taken October 1939 by John VachonOldest shopping strip mall in Ohio, Greensboro, Ohio October 1939 by John Vachon

Boy Scout Troop Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Boy Scout Troop Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Boy Scout Troop Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Boy Scout Troop Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 2

Adult Education typing class Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Adult Education typing class Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

School grounds Greenhills, Ohio October 1939 by John VachonSchool grounds Greenhills, Ohio October 1939 by John Vachon

Behind School Greenhills, Ohio October 1939 by John Vachon

Greenhills, Ohio October 1939 by John Vachon

Six-man football played in high school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Six-man football played in high school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Swimming pool, business district at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Swimming pool, business district at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 1

Bus which traveled between Cincinnati and Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Bus which traveled between Cincinnati and Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 2

Nearly 4,000 residents inhabited the homes

Nearly 4,000 residents inhabited 1,660 homes, with many families including third and fourth generation descendants from original “pioneers.”

Several unique housing units are available in the village. The original government-built area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Much of the local retail activity is centered in historic Greenhills Shopping Center.

Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Family moving in at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 3

Community center at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Community center at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Community building at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Community center at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 3

Community building at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Community center at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 2

Community buildings at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

First Aid class for members of volunteer Fire Dept. at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939
First Aid class for volunteers of Fire Dept. at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

First Aid class for members of volunteer Fire Dept. at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939First Aid class for members of volunteer Fire Dept. at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Physical education class for school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Physical education class for school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Physical education class for school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Physical education class for school at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 2

Swimming pool in foreground at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Swimming pool in foreground at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Houses at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 13

Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Apartment Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 14

Apartment Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Houses Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 15

Greenhills cost $11.5 Million

Greenhills alone cost $11.5 million, which included purchasing 5,360 acres of land in Springfield Township. About 3,300 workers spent 4.3 million man-hours constructing the town, and many of them became its first residents.

The land north of town was divided into large farms, where residents would come for fresh milk and produce.

Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939

Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 2

Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939Farm at Greenhills, Ohio by John Vachon October 1939 3

The towns were declared unconstitutional

Tugwell envisioned 20 of these towns and before the program was declared unconstitutional he managed to build three: Greenbelt, Maryland (outside of Washington), Greendale, Wisconsin (outside of Milwaukee) and Greenhills, Ohio (outside of Cincinnati).

In 1939, the forest to the south was handed over to the Hamilton County Park Board to form Winton Woods.

After World War II, Uncle Sam decided to sell off the greenbelt towns, ending the community experiment. On Dec. 9, 1949, the Greenhills Home Owners Corp., a nonprofit tenant group, purchased 610 acres of Greenhills for $3.5 million. The tenants then bought the properties they had been renting.

New one-family houses of the typical suburban style were built, turning Greenhills into a bedroom community. The northern farmland was sold in 1952 to create New Greenhills, which was instead named Forest Park.

 More photographs of this unique and historic housing project of 1935

“Tapestry of Love is a Historical fiction series about the ancestors of a family who originally settled on the Eastern Shore of Virginia in 1638 and migrated to Alabama in the early 1800’s

RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel Of Colonial America: Book one in the Tapestry of Love Series

RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love Book 1): Book 1 in Tapestry of Love Series


By (author): Donna R Causey

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me

All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .

For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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