Can you believe that a cotton mill outside Atlanta had a ‘tornado’ fence? [old pics]

In 1939 when Photojournalist, Marion Post Wolcott, traveled to Georgia, she took many photographs. Some of her pictures included these three photographs of mill houses in Greene County, Georgia. One photo was of a ‘tornado’ fence around the cotton mill. I wonder if it was meant to divert tornadoes.

Mill workers' homes. Greene County, Georgia3

 

Mill workers' homes. Greene County, Georgia

Mill workers' homes. Greene County, Georgia2

In this group of photographs, she included this one of a fence surrounding a cotton mill outside Atlanta and entitled it:

“Tornado” fence at cotton mill. Atlanta, Georgia 1939

Tornado fence at cotton mill. Atlanta, Georgia

The fence is rather high.  If anyone has an explanation for this being called a “tornado” fence, please comment below. I would really like to know the answer.

Here are some other interesting photographs Marion Post Wolcott took around the Atlanta area in 1939 with her descriptions and notes

“Cherished” customer. buying gas, near Atlanta, GeorgiaCherished customer. Negro buying gas, near Atlanta, Georgia

cherished customer

Black district in Atlanta, GeorgiaSlums in Negro district. Atlanta, Georgia2 1939

Slums in Negro district. Atlanta, Georgia 1939

black district in ATlanta

Black Domestic Servant in 1939Negro domestic servant. Atlanta, Georgia may 1939

Gullied land and pine trees near Atlanta, Georgia

Gullied land and pine trees near Atlanta, Georgia

 

Eroded land, south Georgia, near AtlantaEroded land, south Georgia, near Atlanta

Eroded land, south Georgia, near Atlanta2

 

Eroded land, south Georgia, near Atlanta3

 

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3 Responses to Can you believe that a cotton mill outside Atlanta had a ‘tornado’ fence? [old pics]

  1. Donna — Your story and picture about a tornado fence around a business in Atlanta asked for explanation of the name. Some fence maker in the 1930s advertised its wire linked, or chain linked, fence as strong enough, when properly installed, to withstand a tornado. But like all other man-made things, it can’t withstand the elements and time.
    Joe McKnight

  2. The “killer” in tornadoes is the debris flying forward or in circles at 100 plus miles per hour. Windows, posts, poles, trees, cars, etc. cut people and structures to shreds. I believe this “tornado fence” was promoted to hold this debris back from the homes pictured. Must not have worked or we would still have them in tornado prone areas of the country.

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