The Japanese Internment of WWII – Their story in pictures – Part III – Transportation

After Pearl Harbor, Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps for the duration of WWII. They were considered enemy aliens even though many had lived in America for years.

Photographer Russell Lee took photographs of  their relocation in April and May of 1942 in the pictures below. (See Japanese for additional photographs of this internment.

Reception camps were set up to process and register the relocated Japanese-Americans before finally transporting them to Internment camps.  The Japanese-Americans used all means of transportation to travel to the reception areas.

Waiting for trains to reception area

Japanese-American child headed for reception center

Japanese waiting for train by Russell Lee Japanese waiting for train2

TrainThe evacuation of Japanese-Americans from West coast areas under United States Army war emergency order train Los Angeles, California train Los Angeles, California2 train The evacuation of Japanese-Americans from West coast areas under United States Army war emergency order train The evacuation of Japanese-Americans from West coast areas under United States Army war emergency order3 train The evacuation of Japanese-Americans from West coast areas under United States Army war emergency order4

Japanese waiting for a train which will take them to Owens Valley during evacuation of Japanese-Americans from West coast under United States Army war emergency order

 

 

 

Buses were also utilized as transportationJapanese-Americans boarding bus for reception centerJapanese-Americans transferring from train to bus at Lone Pine, California, bound for war relocation authority center at Manzanar

Others simply drove to the reception centers

Japanese arrive at the Santa Anita reception center4

 

Japanese family arriving at the center2

 

 

 

See historical books by Donna R. Causey

Discordance: The Cottinghams Filled with drama, suspense, humor, and romance, DISCORDANCE continues the family saga from the Tapestry of Love series with the children of Mary Dixon who married Thomas Cottingham.

Discordance:: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)


By (author): Donna R Causey

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me

All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .

For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

One Response to The Japanese Internment of WWII – Their story in pictures – Part III – Transportation

  1. Pingback: The Japanese Internment of WWII – The Evacuation – [vintage photographs] – Part I | Days Gone By

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